Thursday, June 30, 2011

Caledonia Gorge (oil on canvas 11 x 14 in.) Sold

27 June finds us looking out over the Caledonia Gorge Natural Protected Area from the viewpoint just north of the village of Riverside-Albert, New Brunswick. The falls on Crooked Creek can be seen where the sun glints on it. The high wall of the gorge is visible there too. The sun coming through clouds makes a golden necklace just before Caledonia Mountain, and stays there just long enough for me to paint it in.
The New New Brunswick Museum's web page says that "The Caledonia Gorge Protected Natural Area (CG PNA), at 2,832 ha is the smallest of New Brunswick's 10 largest PNAs and representative of the Central Uplands Ecoregion.  Situated in the southeast corner of New Brunswick, this PNA captures the steeply-sloping Crooked Creek Gorge and tributaries where they cut into the Fundy Plateau, before flowing into the Bay of Fundy".  
The Museum's Facebook page shows photos of Bio-blitz activities so far. There will be an open house here at the lab on Tuesday next week from 4-8 pm.

1 comment:

  1. While Aleta was painting this, I told her & Sophie the story of how the Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus, or "thud" in our database vernacular) got its nerve:

    First the Squirrel invented the felt-tip marker, and drew a snazzy racing strip along its sides between the red and white fur. Feeling that if it looked that sharp, it ought to have accomplishments, it scouted out birds, and invented the raw-egg omelette. This achieved, it figured it had better get into land development, so it cut the cones off Black Spruces, producing a distinctively clumpy skyline that greatly increased real estate values, and then dug underground condominiums in the piles of resulting scales. Feeling the need to further control its environment, it lept onto the ears of passing Bears, and clung to their heads, shouting so loudly that they chose to hibernate for half the year, rather than going deaf by listening to Squirrels. Satisfied that this was just a start, it stood up on branches, telling everyone, including us, and except Martens, how invulnerable it was to predation.

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